DIRTY RESTAURANT STORIES

Q – My wife and I were curious if  your restaurant writers saw the 20-20 on ABC TV about food and restaurant contamination (November 16th)? What did you think about it?

A – Yes, we saw it. It struck us as a combo platter of light investigative reporting that really didn’t take on the corporate entities that are selling our kids on corn syrup, salt, and chemically modified foods. But anything on this subject is helpful so we won’t be too critical.

The commentary on fish reflected some information we reported here several years ago. One expert said that virtually no one who orders Red Snapper in a restaurant is eating Red Snapper. Those who order “white tuna” on a sushi menu should know there is no such fish. They are really being served Escobar, a fish that causes diarrhea.

The reporting on airline food contamination was interesting because it showed that the problem is not ion the galley but in the food catering kitchens that serve the airlines. It was nice to know that First Class and Business Class passengers are just as likely to get Salmonella poisoning as coach passengers, a bit of democracy at 30,000 feet.

Some of the blue light/bacteria smear reporting was interesting. 20-20 claims that the single most likely source of contamination in the average restaurant, the place to pick up e-coli and his cousins, is your seat. They recommend that diners get up and wash their hands after they are seated. But, then again, aren’t you returning to the same seat. It turns out that restaurant seats, in all price ranges, are rarely disinfected.

Also surprising was the fact that the actual menu, along with salt and pepper shakers were found to be far more filthy than bathroom fixtures, sinks, handles etc. 

Lessons: When dining out, bring a cover for your chair, never touch the menu, and never touch the salt and pepper shakers.  Or just wear gloves when dining out.

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